Friday, May 23, 2014

Friday Feature: Snip, Snip Revenge (Review)



Genre: Contemporary Romance

Word Count: 64, 185

ISBN: 978-1-77130-816-8

Editor: JC Chute

Cover Artist: Sour Cherry Designs

Beautiful, confident Tabby Karim has plans for the winter: nab a role in her school’s dramatic production, make the new boy Michael hers, and keep bigoted Heather—with her relentless Ay-rab comments—at bay. When a teacher’s lie and her father’s hastiness rob her of her beautiful hair, her dreams are dashed. The fastest barber in Miami Beach has made her look practically bald. 

With all her pretty hair gone, Tabby doesn’t believe she fits the feminine role she’s auditioning for. Michael is still interested in her, but he’s playing it cool. Heather has taken to bullying her online, which is easier to do with Tabby’s ugly haircut. Tabby spearheads Operation Revenge, which proves satisfying until all of her problems deepen. After messing up, she sets to make things right.

My thoughts:
This book has an array of emotions. At first, Tabby is full of confidence. She thinks her long hair, which is the envy of most girls in her school and catches the eyes of most boys, makes her a beauty that can't be ignored. But when a lice outbreak hits her school and Tabby's least favorite teacher diagnoses her with lice, everything changes. Her father takes her to a barber and has all her hair chopped off. I felt terrible for Tabby because she didn't even have lice. Tabby's emotions roller coaster after this. I won't give spoilers, but Sharif shows us all sides of Tabby as she tries to figure out who she is without her beautiful hair.

I really enjoyed seeing Tabby grow in this story. There were times when I wanted to reach into my Kindle and shake her, but at the same time I felt bad for her and understood where her anger was coming from. Sharif really handles the emotional aspects of this story well, and because of that I read this book very quickly. I think Sharif has a winner here.

19 comments:

  1. Her hair is cut off because she has lice - only she doesn't. Oh, that's just miserable. Poor girl! You're right, I think this book is a real winner! :)

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    1. It was very good. Definitely evokes emotion.

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  2. Thank you so much for the fantastic feature. :) I also wanted to shake Tabby.

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    1. You're very welcome! I really enjoyed the book. :)

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  3. Congratulations to Medeia on her new release. Her book looks awesome.

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    1. It is. Thanks for checking it out, Vanessa.

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  4. Good review, it makes the book sound very intriguing.

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  5. Wow, I didn't know anybody would cut a kid's hair off due to lice (even if real) in this day and age. The idea of looking for our identity when we lose the surface-level thing we think IDs us is intriguing!

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    1. Yes. I think a lot of teens will identify with that aspect of the story.

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  6. Ooh. Looks good. I like the character's ethnicity being in there too, it's not a common one to look through in a book.

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  7. I've been seeing this book all over and the concept behind it is so intriguing to me. I'm glad you enjoyed it, Kelly, and that it took you through a range of emotions :-)

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    1. I love when books make you feel a range of emotions. :)

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  8. Great review! I totally relate to her attachment to her hair.Growing up I always wanted long hair. I even put fake hair in. Regretted it later when all that stuff messed up my scalp ;) Sounds like an interesting read.

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    1. Hair is a sensitive thing for women. That's why I grew my hair really long and then donated it to cancer patients. I also found out it takes 6 donations to make one wig. Wow!

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  9. An excellent review! Sounds good, Kelly.

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  10. Loved reading your review of Medeia's book, Kelly!

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