Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Writer Wednesday: Choices of a Hybrid Author

Let's face it. The publishing world is changing. I've been a hybrid author for a while now, releasing books both through self-publishing and through traditional publishing houses. Honestly, there are pros and cons to both, and I feel you have to do what is best for you and your book.

I decided to branch out into writing adult, because I'm not writing enough age groups already, right? ;) Well, when I sat down to do my taxes (Eek!) I realized my self-published Ashelyn Drake books tend to sell better than my traditionally published Ashelyn Drake books. Hmm… It could be the age levels affecting this. It could be a lot of things, actually. Oddly enough, Ashelyn Drake sells better on Barnes and Noble than Amazon, too. (Don't ask me how I feel about B&N doing away with the Nook. I'm still crying over that.) But I've decided that my first Ashelyn Drake adult titles will be self-published. 

You can ask my agent how I feel about self-publishing. It makes me crazy nervous. Even though I've done it before, I panic. Why? It's a LOT of work to self-publish. A LOT. But if sales are better, I think that work is worth it. Does this mean I'll self-publish all my adult titles? Nope. I'm a hybrid author and I don't see that changing, because like I said, there are pros and cons to self-publishing and traditional publishing. 

But I feel really good about self-publishing Lies We Tell. Did I just title drop? ;) Scared? Yes. But good at the same time. I'm weird like that. And since Lies We Tell is with my editor now, it might be coming your way sooner than anticipated.

*If you have a question you'd like me to answer from the other side of the editor's desk, feel free to leave it in the comments and I'll schedule it for a future post.

26 comments:

  1. You're in a fantastic position to do some analysis and pros/cons to both. So interesting about better on B&N than on Amazon. Hmm... I'll be honest. The whole realm of noting and comparing, learning about marketing and promoting makes my head spin, so I really appreciate reading posts like this.

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  2. I know so many self-published authors who make next to nothing...so I think you work your buttocks off promoting all of your books! I have several friends who used to be traditionally published but self publish now because they figure if they have to work their butts off promoting their work, they want to get every dime of it. They were published back in the day when publishers actually did the promotion--of course, that was before social media and blogging and the Internet. It's far easier for authors to promote our own stuff than it used to be when you had to send out news releases and just hope newspapers reported it.

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    1. Very true. And so much falls on the author now.

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  3. isn't it crazy how things change so much in publishing day-to-day?? I feel like with the amount of promo and work we do on our own books there's not much difference between self and trad pubbing!

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    1. Yeah, the royalty rate is different. ;) Seriously though, there are publishers doing it correctly. One of mine has been absolutely amazing to work with, but I've been burned by other publishers.

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  4. I completely agree with you. I'm a hybrid too, because different books need to take different paths. I'm happy we now have viable options with self-publishing as well as within traditional publishing. It's a lot of work. I think I might try to catch an agent's attention with my next manuscript. I'd love to have someone on my team.

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    1. Yes, every book is different. We have to do what's best for each book, whether that's publishing traditionally or on our own.

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  5. You are the real Super Author (a la Superwoman) in that you do it all, crossing all genres and age-levels and publishing modalities. I would dread being my own publisher just because I am somewhat aware of the incredible amount of energy that would entail.

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    1. It does require a lot of energy and time. That's very true. That's why I have to know it's the best choice for the book to pursue that option.

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  6. I'm a hybrid author too. And there are definitely perks to both options. It's interesting about your finds on what sells best and on which platform.

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    1. I was shocked by my sales on B&N. I can't figure out why they're so much better than Amazon.

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  7. It seems to be working for you. I can just imagine how complicated it can get come tax time to keep names straight.

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    1. Everything Ashelyn is published by Kelly, if that makes sense. It helps.

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  8. That's great about the sales. You have to do what's right for yourself and the project. I enjoy working with publishers, but wouldn't be surprised if I became a hybrid author one day.

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    1. When I originally self published it was because I wanted to learn that side of publishing.

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  9. When did writing get so complicated? :) I've thought about self-publishing but have no idea where to start. I like the way authors have more control over their stories. Maybe some day... You're doing great.

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    1. If you ever decide to self publish, feel free to ask me questions. If I can help, I'd be happy to.

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  10. Good for you, Kelly! I think it's wonderful that B&N is still going as strong as it is and giving the other competition. Monopolies get tiresome; as in publishing. Who doesn't find another route when one road is gridlocked?
    Best wishes:-)

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  11. I like the word "hybrid author". It really describes a lot of us out here. It helps though when we see a successful author like you, Kelly, using both avenues. Thank you for always sharing, teaching, and helping.

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  12. Really helpful post, Kelly. Thank you.

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  13. Good luck with the adult titles, too, Kelly. And have fun in self-publishing! It's a lot, a lot of work, but there's a lot of gratification and pride after your work is released, too. (Just remember to check and double-check everything before you submit to the distribution outlets. You'll do fine!)

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    1. I've done it before, which is why I didn't make the decision lightly. It's a tough route to take.

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