Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Writer Wednesday: Do Editors Google Authors?


Today's topic comes courtesy of Miss Leandra Wallace. Leandra wants to know if editors check out an author's site if they are interested in their work.

Why, yes. Yes, we do. :) If I really love a submission, I definitely get curious about the author. So I look them up. What am I looking for? Well, I want to see that you are active on social media. That could mean a lot of things though. Some authors like to have websites that include any books published, a bio, and little more. Some are all over social media: Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Instagram, you name it. Others just blog and leave it at that. Basically what I'm looking for is that you are willing to interact with readers and you have a place for readers to find you and contact you.

So don't feel you need to join every social media site out there. Actually, don't. I'd rather see a writer join a few and be interactive than be on a ton of sites and never post. So choose what works for you and do that well.

Now if I can't find an author, this would prompt me to ask him/her about his/her online presence. It doesn't mean a definite pass on a manuscript, but I'd need to know that the author is willing to build an online platform—and well before the book's potential release date.

*If you have a topic you'd like me to cover in a Writer Wednesday post, feel free to leave it in the comments.*

24 comments:

  1. It surprises me how many authors - or other professionals - still don't have an online presence. So easy to do anymore. Affordable. And it's pretty much how readers (customers) find out more about your work. Great post, Kelly. Glad Leandra asked the question.

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    1. Yes. Even kids are in computers all the time. My daughter is 8 and she looks up authors online.

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  2. Whenever I find a book I really enjoyed, one of the first things I do is check out the author online. If I can't find anything (a blog, a Twitter presence or Goodreads presence or any other social media presence), I'd be pretty disappointed. How else would I be able to follow this person and know about her next piece of work? I like what you said about not getting on every platform though, Kelly. That would be exhausting.

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    1. Yes, there's no reason to be everywhere. Just be somewhere readers can find you.

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  3. Well then, I have a 6 year old platform and no manuscript! lol

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    1. lol But you're ready with the platform when you do have that manuscript finished. ;)

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  4. As usual, your advice is sober and to the point. I might add that a never-published writer may hesitate before setting a fixed website, as those tend to be too thin. One way to get around that is to have a site that is a resource for writers/your passion, especially as it relates to your stories/your life story if it is exceptional.

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    1. That is great advice, Mirka. Thank you for adding that. Being a resource for other writers is a good way to build a platform and give back to the industry.

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  5. Thanks for answering, Kelly! =) Like Claudine said, I'm always disappointed if I can't find an author online. Or I do, and everything looks old and stale, like the last post/tweet/update was a year ago or so. Yuck. ;)

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    1. Yeah, that's not an active author. You definitely want to be present.

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  6. It is good to have an online present but be yourself and not try too hard to the point it just seems bulky.

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    1. Being yourself is key. People want to get to know the real you.

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  7. I once saw an agent admit on Twitter that she always Googled an author before making an offer of representation, just to make sure the author wasn't "Crazypants." There's that! You want to have an online presence, but you need to make sure it's professional, too!

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    1. Yes, there is that. :) You want to make sure the author is someone who is professional and will be a good addition to the company.

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  8. This is great. I have a question: I know editors/agents are busy people, but I always hear these incredible stories about how a query or manuscript hits their email/desk and they know immediately that they want it and get back to the author within a day. Most don't go that fast, but how long, usually, does it take an agent/editor to make a decision once they've requested and read the manuscript?

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    1. Great question, Johnell. I'm adding that topic to my list. Thanks.

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  9. I've heard that same thing from other editors and agents many times over the years. I think Twitter is essential for an aspiring author--SO many editors and agents use that as a professional tool. Plus, Pitch Wars and such...you don't see those opportunities anywhere else.

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    1. Yes. Twitter is a great way to connect with editors and agents.

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  10. I've wondered if editors checked authors' blogs and sites. Thanks for telling us they do.

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  11. Awesome post! I think it makes sense for editors to check out authors online. It is definitely important for authors to interact with readers and other writers. I am happy to hear that editors think so too and check out authors. :)
    ~Jess

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